Hope for the Second Generation

Last week, I attended a week-long Youth Conference of the Church of Pentecost – UK at Nottingham University. (The Church of Pentecost is a Ghana-originated Pentecostal church that has spread to over 90 countries and has 125 churches and 14000 members in Britain). The entire period of six days was a delightful mixture of youth…

A Calf is Born with Ears

Two weeks ago — on the 26th of June 2015 — we had the main Missio Africanus Conference of the year at the Church Mission Society’s CMS House in Oxford. It was a great day with excellent attendance and brilliant conversations on emerging theological themes in African Christianity (both in Africa and in the Diaspora)….

Would you like to know us theologically?—John Mbiti

Theologians from the new (or younger) churches have made their pilgrimage to the theological learning of older churches. We had no alternative. We have eaten theology with you. We have drunk theology with you. We have dreamed theology with you. But it has all been, in a sense, your theology. We know you theologically. The…

A Journal of African Missiology

Last week, we published our first issue of the Missio Africanus journal … a journal that is dedicated to the field of missiology on the African continent … a type of missiology that is shaped by the African understanding of God’s mission — missio Dei — in the light of the African life and worldview. It…

Diaspora Theology and the Scandal of an Immigrant God.

I had a chance to teach a brilliant bunch of missional pioneers last week, and the subject was “Migration and Mission.” The lesson drew from the usual resources in the migration-mission-theology conversation. Using my own book as a resource, in which I have dedicated a few pages to a theology of migration and another to the…

Mission After Globalisation

Mission After Globalisation: The Problem of Race There is gnawing silence in contemporary missiological conversations on the subject of race and its implications on mission – or missio Dei – in this twenty-first century. I believe this silence is very revealing, especially about the way the unfolding story of God’s mission will be told and interpreted in…

Introducing “Sent Forth: African Missionary Work in the West”

For those interested in what has been (wrongfully) called “reverse mission,” (which should otherwise be called non-Western missionary work in the West) there is a new resource coming. It is a book that I have written with the purpose of beginning to build cross-cultural bridges between African Christians and the West. It has been published…

Missio Africanus: The Start of a Conversation

On the 27th of June 2014, some 75 Christian leaders from different parts of the UK met at the legendary Crowther Hall in Selly Oak, Birmingham, for seminar called Missio Africanus.[1] A third of the gathering were (white) British pastors and leaders of missions organisations, and the remaining two thirds were Africans from different denominations…

Incarnational Theology and Intercultural Mutuality

In a Masters class that I taught recently, one of the students asked me a question that I found tricky: “can missional incarnation happen upwards?” Knowing the student, it was clear to me that I was faced with a good trap. On the one hand, I would have to process this question in the light…

Self-theologising In The Diasopra

Liberating Theology: Can Africans Self-theologise in the Diaspora? In the mid–1800’s, two missionary leaders, Henry Venn and Rufus Anderson, suggested that the new churches that came out of the Western missionaries’ work in Africa and other places needed to be self-governing, self-propagating, and self-supporting in order to be considered mature enough to be left on…